Kindle Pricing

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New paperback, £6.49 – kindle edition, £10.40

What? I know the arguments about that the authors need to eat and not wanting to breed another generation of torrent-wielding pirates, but honestly, why such a ridiculous mark-up.

There is no scarcity value in eBooks. Why should a physical copy, posted to my house cost over a third LESS than a version whose couple of hundred Kb wouldn’t even raise a blip on the most frugal of data plans?

The book publishers need to sort themselves out. I love the Kindle, the flexibility, the convenience, the reduced need for shelves or guilt over once-read novels taking up house-space.

If there’s an attempt at justification, I’ll happily listen. I’m not saying that I think eBooks should be pennies in the pound, I want to pay a reasonable amount to reward the author for their effort and ensure repetition. I just can’t see a valid reason for a premium – especially such a hefty one – over the paperback price.

  1. Why should the pricing reflect costs more than perceived value? Amazon is quite good at dynamically pricing its goods, so if anything you should be blaming the market for paying these prices rather than the publishers for setting them.

    If for each of the people complaining about Kindle prices there are ten paying them… the publishers would be pretty mad to change anything. Clearly the value is in the convenience rather than the material costs.

    As for comparative pricing… would you be happier if they left the ebook prices alone and instead charged more for paper books?

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